Welcome to River City Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Herniated Disc (sciatica)

Herniated Lumbar Disc


Health insurance is not required to participate in our research studies.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information
(904) 861-3050 

Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic Arthritis


Health insurance is not required to participate in our research studies.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information
(904) 861-3050 





View all active studies

Our Volunteers Love Us


Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

Sign Up


I'm interested in... (Scroll to select multiple)




Our Staff

View All

Sonia Gerardo

Sonia has been employed with the Hospital Team TWICE! She started in 2000 and took a break in 2006 to raise her two young boys.  She missed us so much she returned in 2013 and has been keeping co-workers laughing with her fun personality ever since.  Sonia loves historical documentaries, reading, and cooking. Some fun facts about Sonia: she spent time in the Army and was one belt away from a black belt in karate earlier in her life.

Laura Little

Laura has been in the clinical research industry since 2003. She started with JCCR in 2008 and has juggled a variety of positions in the company.  At RCCR, Laura fills multiple roles including Lab Manager, Administrative Assistant and Research Assistant.  She makes sure we are slways well-stocked with office supplies and keeps us organized daily! Laura has been married to her sweetheart, Scotty, since 2001, she loves coffee and Chunk, her dog.

Cassie Lawler

Cassie is a RN Administrative Coordinator, and has worked at RCCR since 2017. Prior to coming to RCCR, she worked in cardiology research at Washington University in St. Louis and as a nurse in Family Medicine and Pediatrics in Georgia. She and her husband have 3 small children who keep them busy since they are all very close in age. She can’t start her day without a cup of coffee in hand, and enjoys spending time with her family, reading, and binging on HGTV shows to gather more ideas for her handy husband to continue to fix up their older home!

Lastest Blog Post:


Hearts: Male Vs. Female

The old saying goes: Men are from Mars and Women are from Venus. This exaggeration is- well… an exaggeration, but there are some differences between male and female heart health that causes an inkling of truth to shine out through the expression. The most common kind of heart disease, among both men and women, is coronary artery disease. Coronary artery disease is caused when cholesterol plaque is built up inside the arteries, and if left untreated coronary artery disease can obstruct blood flow to the heart muscle and lead to a heart attack. 

When experiencing a heart attack, the individual will usually experience chest pain, shortness of breath, and pain in their left arm, but these symptoms are not universal. Remember when we were talking about the differences between men and women? Women are more likely to experience uncommon heart attack symptoms than men are! These symptoms can include indigestion, pain in both arms, unusual fatigue and abdominal discomfort. Physicians are still uncertain why women are more likely to experience unusual symptoms. There are some theories about hormonal changes and the difference in valve and vessel sizes, but for the most part it is still unknown. 

Lowering your risk of a heart attack, however, is not a mystery. Research shows staying active, eating healthy, and monitoring your blood pressure and cholesterol levels regularly leads to decreased cardiovascular risk.  Research also shows that individuals involved in clinical research have better health care outcomes than those who are not.
 
We are currently enrolling in studies that may help you lower important factors like elevated triglycerides and cholesterol which may help lower your risk of cardiovascular events. 


References:

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/heart_vascular_institute/centers_excellence/womens_cardiovascular_health_center/patient_information/health_topics/menopause_cardiovascular_system.html

https://www.lahey.org/article/differences-between-mens-and-womens-hearts/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3018605/

https://www.clinicaltrials.gov


View the full blog